Working in Bookselling: Bill Samuel and Trevor Goul-Wheeker

Working in Bookselling Interview Series

Bill Samuel
Bill Samuel

Bill Samuel and Trevor Goul-Wheeker have, between them, run some of Britain’s biggest bookshops, and so we are delighted to have been given the opportunity to find out more about their careers in the industry.  Bill was Vice Chairman of his family’s business Foyles bookshop for twenty years until the company was sold in 2018.  In that time, he was involved in other projects such as the creation of the Emirates Literature Festival held in Dubai.  He now has a place on the board of the BA and is chair of Batch.  His wife Vivienne has always worked in the book trade, too, which is how they met.

Trevor Goul-Wheeker
Trevor Goul-Wheeker

Trevor, after working in the chemicals and biochemicals industries as a B2B marketeer, became managing director of Hammick’s bookshops in 1994, becoming non-executive director of books at W.H. Smith in 2003, and was chairman of Blackwell’s for ten years until 2019.  He served on the council of the BA for nine years and received two British Book Awards for Marketing and Services to Bookselling.  In 2012, Trevor was appointed Chair of the Business School Advisory Board at the University of Greenwich, who generously awarded him with an Honorary MBA in 2015.

We asked Bill and Trevor the same questions about their longstanding careers and their responses give a fascinating glimpse into their views on bookselling, what they love about the trade and the advice they would give to booksellers out on the shopfloor of today.

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Cultural Interaction Spaces

It is now 90 days since lockdown began in Wales, and I am still wishing I had stopped at my local bookstore on my way home the day before it happened.

This exile from the space of the bookstore has developed my appreciation for the experience offered by that counter-space where commerce and culture agree a tenuous pact of co-existence. This balancing act happens within an identifiable physical location, within borders defined by the walls of the room, the limits of the market stall, or the edges of the book table. Within that defined space, that cultural / commercial balance creates a meaningful location, a normalcy specific to that space–a type of commercial and a cultural identity that may not exist beyond its bounds. Such meaningful locations exist in more than just bookstores, of course. Churches, hospitals, ancient monuments, the local garden centre, the town recycling centre–all of these spaces define a normalcy that dissipates as one moves away from them.

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